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Bryan Adams - "Summer of 69"

Concert unknown. 1993. Adams wrote this with the songwriter Jim Vallance, who wrote several Aerosmith songs and often collaborated with Adams. On his website, Vallance explains that the song went through a number of changes, and it was originally called "Best Days Of My Life," with the line "Summer Of '69" appearing just once in the lyrics. In the Summer of '69, Bryan was 9 years old. He told Songfacts: "It's a very simple song about looking back on the summertime and making love. For me, the '69 was a metaphor for making love not about the year.

Lionel Richie - "All Night Long"

Live from the 'Can't Slown Down Tour'. 1984. Lionel Richie told CNN: "What I try to write about are real events. There will always be an easy like Sunday morning. There will always be an endless love. There will always be an all night long." Richie said to CNN that it took him about two months write this song. He explained: "I just couldn't find the ending - I couldn't find all night long to save my life. I had everything, the verses, the middle part, all the stuff. I just did not have all night long. It took me forever to find it. And finally one night, the heavens opened up and came through."

Ben E. King - "Stand By Me"

Live at the Montreux Jazz Festival 1987. Ben E. King recorded this shortly after leaving The Drifters in 1960. It gave him a solid reputation as a solo artist. The song was credited as being written by Leiber, Stoller and King. Charles Albert Tindley, who composed the original hymn, was left off the composer credits as his work had been sufficiently transformed. This wasn't the first time Tindley was omitted from the credits of a song he originated: he also wrote "I'll Overcome Someday," which eventually became "We Shall Overcome."

The Beatles - "Let it Be"

Concert unknown. Paul McCartney wrote this song. It was inspired by his mother, Mary, who died when he was 14. Many people thought "Mother Mary" was a biblical reference when they heard it. Paul McCartney wrote this song. It was inspired by his mother, Mary, who died when he was 14. Many people thought "Mother Mary" was a biblical reference when they heard it.

The Who - "Baba O'Riley"

Live at the Charlton, 1974. The title is not mentioned in the lyrics, so the song is often referred to as "Teenage Wasteland." The "Teenage Wasteland" section was a completely different song Townshend combined with his "Baba O'Riley" idea to form the song. Pete Townshend spent a few weeks in his home studio putting together the part that sounds like a synthesizer on a Lowry organ. His goal: to create "a replication of the electronic music of the future."

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