Live on Stage

Bryan Adams - "Summer of 69"



Concert unknown. 1993. Adams wrote this with the songwriter Jim Vallance, who wrote several Aerosmith songs and often collaborated with Adams. On his website, Vallance explains that the song went through a number of changes, and it was originally called "Best Days Of My Life," with the line "Summer Of '69" appearing just once in the lyrics. In the Summer of '69, Bryan was 9 years old. He told Songfacts: "It's a very simple song about looking back on the summertime and making love. For me, the '69 was a metaphor for making love not about the year.

Adams had a few hits before this was released, his biggest being "Straight From The Heart," but this song and the rest of the Reckless album made him a star. Vallance reflects: "Looking back, I think 'Summer Of '69' was Bryan and I at our best. We hadn't had any real 'success' yet... that would come when Reckless went to #1 on the charts and sold 12 million copies... but that was a year away. In January 1984 Bryan and I were still writing songs for all the right reasons, for the pure love and joy of it. We had nothing to prove, and even less to lose. We wrote songs to please ourselves. Everything started to unravel after Reckless."

Lionel Richie - "All Night Long"



Live from the 'Can't Slown Down Tour'. 1984. Lionel Richie told CNN: "What I try to write about are real events. There will always be an easy like Sunday morning. There will always be an endless love. There will always be an all night long." Richie said to CNN that it took him about two months write this song. He explained: "I just couldn't find the ending - I couldn't find all night long to save my life. I had everything, the verses, the middle part, all the stuff. I just did not have all night long. It took me forever to find it. And finally one night, the heavens opened up and came through."

Written by the man himself, this was Lionel Richie's fourth solo single - the first being a duet with Diana Ross. "All Night Long..." is basically a fun track. Released on the Motown Label in both 7-inch and 12-inch formats, co-produced with James Carmichael and backed by "Wandering Stranger," it topped the Hot 100 for four weeks. The radio edit runs to 4 minutes 16 seconds; the album version to 6 minutes 25 seconds. The song also sold well internationally, and was performed by Richie at the closing ceremony of the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles.

Richie told The Epoch Times that he got the vibe for this song from his vacations in the Caribbean. He explained: "I'm one of those guys that - I don't look for something new. I look for what people do everyday. And I noticed that, anytime I would come on vacation, everybody who can rap is on vacation doing a calypso dance. Everybody who's singing Opera, they conform to some form of calypso or some form of reggae. So when I went back to do 'All Night Long' it was very simple. All I had to do was find that beat that everybody dances to when they go on vacation."

Ben E. King - "Stand By Me"



Live at the Montreux Jazz Festival 1987. Ben E. King recorded this shortly after leaving The Drifters in 1960. It gave him a solid reputation as a solo artist. The song was credited as being written by Leiber, Stoller and King. Charles Albert Tindley, who composed the original hymn, was left off the composer credits as his work had been sufficiently transformed. This wasn't the first time Tindley was omitted from the credits of a song he originated: he also wrote "I'll Overcome Someday," which eventually became "We Shall Overcome."

"Stand By Me" was the name of a gospel hymn written by the Philadelphia minister Charles Albert Tindley in 1905. His hymn became popular in churches throughout the American South and was recorded by various gospel acts in the 1950s. The most popular adaptation was by The Staple Singers, who recorded it in 1955. It was this version that Ben E. King heard; he pushed The Drifters to record it, but the group's manager rejected it.

After leaving The Drifters, King auditioned for the wildly successful songwriting/production team of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, singing a few popular songs before doing what he had of "Stand By Me," which was just a few lines of lyrics with some humming to fill in the words. He agreed to collaborate on the song with Leiber and Stoller, who gave it a more contemporary sound and polished it into a hit. The bassline at the beginning was Stoller's idea.
 

The Beatles - "Let it Be"



Concert unknown. Paul McCartney wrote this song. It was inspired by his mother, Mary, who died when he was 14. Many people thought "Mother Mary" was a biblical reference when they heard it. Paul McCartney wrote this song. It was inspired by his mother, Mary, who died when he was 14. Many people thought "Mother Mary" was a biblical reference when they heard it.

Since Let It Be was The Beatles last album, it made an appropriate statement about leaving problems behind and moving on in life. The album was supposed to convey an entirely different message. It was going to be called "Get Back," and they were going to record it in front of an audience on live TV, with another TV special showing them practicing the songs in the studio. It was going to be The Beatles getting back to their roots and playing unadorned live music instead of struggling in the studio like they did for The White Album. When they started putting the album together, it became clear the project wouldn't work and George Harrison left the sessions. When he returned, they abandoned the live idea and decided to use the TV footage as their last movie. While the movie was being edited, The Beatles recorded and released Abbey Road, then broke up. Eventually, Phil Spector was given the tapes and asked to produce the album, which was released months after The Beatles broke up. By then, it was clear "Let It Be" would be a better name than "Get Back."

The Who - "Baba O'Riley"



Live at the Charlton, 1974. The title is not mentioned in the lyrics, so the song is often referred to as "Teenage Wasteland." The "Teenage Wasteland" section was a completely different song Townshend combined with his "Baba O'Riley" idea to form the song. Pete Townshend spent a few weeks in his home studio putting together the part that sounds like a synthesizer on a Lowry organ. His goal: to create "a replication of the electronic music of the future."

The first part of the title comes from Meher Baba, who was Pete Townshend's spiritual guru. The second part comes from Terry Riley, an experimental, minimalist composer Townshend admired - many of the keyboard riffs and sound effects on Who's Next were a result of Riley's influence. According to the Who's Next liner notes, Townshend wrote it as his vision of what would happen if the spirit of Meher Baba was fed into a computer and transformed into music. The result would be Baba in the style of Terry Riley, or "Baba O'Riley." 


This marked one of the first times a keyboard/synthesizer was used to form the rhythm of a rock song, rather than employing it as a lead instrument.

http://borntolisten.com/2016/05/18/may-18-the-who-live-charlton-athletic-football-ground-the-valley-1974-videos/

Lynyrd Skynyrd - "Free Bird"




This song began as a ballad without the guitar solos at the end, and Lynyrd Skynyrd recorded it that way for the first time in 1972. The lyrics are about a man explaining to a girl why he can't settle down and make a commitment. The opening lines, "If I leave here tomorrow, would you still remember me?" were inspired by Allen Collins' girlfriend Kathy, who had asked him this very question during a fight.

Frontman Johnny Van Zant discussed this song in a track-by-track commentary to promote the band's 2010 CD/DVD Live From Freedom Hall. He said: "For years Skynyrd has always closed the show with that song and the song has different meanings for different people. This kid was telling me that they used it for their graduation song and not too long ago somebody told me that they used it at a funeral. And really it's a love song, its one of the few that Lynyrd Skynyrd's ever had. It's about a guy and a girl. Of course at the end it was dedicated to Duane Allman from the band Allman Brothers because it goes into the guitar part. If you can get through that one you've had a good night at a Skynyrd show."

This song began as a ballad without the guitar solos at the end, and Lynyrd Skynyrd recorded it that way for the first time in 1972. Guitarist Allen Collins had been working on the song on and off for the previous two years. At the time of recording, the song was only 7 1/2 minutes long, but throughout the next year, Collins continued to refine the song until it was recorded for the final cut of Pronounced Leh-nerd Skin-nerd in 1973.

The Police - "Every Breath You Take"



Live in Atlanta, 1983. In America, this was the biggest hit of 1983, according to Billboard's year-end chart. It stayed at #1 for eight weeks, longer than any other song that year (Michael Jackson's "Billie Jean" was #2, with a seven-week stay). This won Grammys in 1984 for Song of the Year and Best Pop Performance By Duo Or Group With Vocal. This is one of the most misinterpreted songs ever. It is about an obsessive stalker, but it sounds like a love song. Some people even used it as their wedding song. The Police frontman Sting wrote it after separating from his first wife, Frances Tomelty.

In a 1983 interview with the New Musical Express, Sting explained: "I think it's a nasty little song, really rather evil. It's about jealousy and surveillance and ownership." Regarding the common misinterpretation of the song, he added: "I think the ambiguity is intrinsic in the song however you treat it because the words are so sadistic. On one level, it's a nice long song with the classic relative minor chords, and underneath there's this distasteful character talking about watching every move. I enjoy that ambiguity. I watched Andy Gibb singing it with some girl on TV a couple of weeks ago, very loving, and totally misinterpreting it. (Laughter) I could still hear the words, which aren't about love at all. I pissed myself laughing."

https://www.songfacts.com/facts/the-police/every-breath-you-take 

Marvin Gaye - "What's Going On"



Concert unknown. 1972. Until this song, Gaye rarely participated in the songwriting process. For this album, he took control of the production so he could make a statement as an artist. Motown management was skeptical, but Gaye was an established star and had enough power to pull it off, going so far as to use an orchestra on this track. Gaye's lyrics in this song were inspired by the stories his brother Frankie told him when he came back from the Vietnam War.

This was one of the first Motown songs to make a powerful political statement. Stevie Wonder and the Temptations were also recording more serious and challenging material, which was a radical departure from the Motown hits of the '60s. The song had a tremendous impact because listeners weren't used to hearing social commentary from Gaye. As Jackson Browne said in a 2008 interview with Rolling Stone: "No one was expecting an anti-war song from him. But it was a moment in time when people were willing to hear it from anybody, if it was heartfelt. And who better than the person who has talked to you about love and desire?" The What's Going On album takes on many issues, including the environment ("Mercy Mercy Me") and poverty ("Inner City Blues"). It was the first album Gaye released that sold a lot of copies. Until then, like most Motown artists, he had lots of hit singles but album sales were secondary.

https://www.songfacts.com/facts/marvin-gaye/whats-going-on 

Diana Ross - "Missing You"




Live from the Forever Diana, 30th Anniversary Tour 1994. Rotterdam, Netherlands. This was Ross' sole #1 R&B hit during her tenure at RCA from 1981-1988. Despite returning to Motown, the site of her greatest hits, Ross never reached the top of the chart again. The closest was #3 with "Workin' Overtime" in 1989."[The song] actually came out of a conversation that Smokey Robinson and I had one evening about how we were missing Marvin and what he meant to us, as well as to music," Ross recalled. "Then Lionel and I got to talking about how we need to tell people that we love them while they're still alive. Lionel used all this to write that beautiful and special song."

https://dianarossofficialfanclub.com/live-in-rotterdam-1994/    More Video! 

The Eagles - "Hotel California"



Written by Don Felder, Glenn Frey and Don Henley, this song is about materialism and excess. California is used as the setting, but it could relate to anywhere in America. Don Henley in the London Daily Mail November 9, 2007 said: "Some of the wilder interpretations of that song have been amazing. It was really about the excesses of American culture and certain girls we knew. But it was also about the uneasy balance between art and commerce."

On November 25, 2007 Henley appeared on the TV news show 60 Minutes, where he was told, "everyone wants to know what this song means." Henley replied: "I know, it's so boring. It's a song about the dark underbelly of the American Dream, and about excess in America which was something we knew about."

He offered yet another interpretation in the 2013 History of the Eagles documentary: "It's a song about a journey from innocence to experience."

Don Felder came up with the musical idea for this song. According to his book Heaven and Hell: My Life in The Eagles, he came up with the idea while playing on the beach. He had the chord progressions and basic guitar tracks, which he played for Don Henley and Glenn Frey, who helped finish the song, with Henley adding the lyrics.

Felder says they recorded the song about a year after he did the original demo, and in the session, he started to improvise the guitar part at the end. Henley stopped him and demanded that he do it exactly like the demo, so he had to call his wife and have her play the cassette demo over the phone so Felder could remember what he played.

The lyric, "Warm smell of colitas," is often interpreted as sexual slang or a reference to marijuana. When we asked Don Felder about the term, he said: "The colitas is a plant that grows in the desert that blooms at night, and it has this kind of pungent, almost funky smell. Don Henley came up with a lot of the lyrics for that song, and he came up with colitas."

The Eagles aimed for a full sensory experience in their songwriting. Felder adds, "When we try to write lyrics, we try to write lyrics that touch multiple senses, things you can see, smell, taste, hear. 'I heard the mission bell,' you know, or 'the warm smell of colitas,' talking about being able to relate something through your sense of smell. Just those sort of things. So that's kind of where 'colitas' came from."

https://www.songfacts.com/facts/eagles/hotel-california

https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/hear-eagles-perform-a-rousing-live-version-of-hotel-california-202441/

Led Zeppelin - "Stairway to Heaven"



Concert unknown. 1973. The most famous rock song of all time, "Stairway To Heaven" wasn't a chart hit because it was never released as a single to the general public. Radio stations received promotional singles which quickly became collector's items. Robert Plant spent much of the '70s answering questions about the lyrics he wrote for "Stairway." When asked why the song was so popular, he said it could be its "abstraction," adding, "Depending on what day it is, I still interpret the song a different way - and I wrote the lyrics."

The lyrics take some pretty wild turns, but the beginning of the song is about a woman who accumulates money, only to find out the hard way her life had no meaning and will not get her into heaven. This is the only part Plant would really explain, as he said it was "a woman getting everything she wanted without giving anything back."

Led Zeppelin started planning "Stairway" in early 1970, when they decided to create a new, epic song to replace "Dazed And Confused" as the centerpiece of their concerts. Jimmy Page would work on the song in an 8-track studio he had installed in his boathouse, trying out different sections on guitar. By April, he was telling journalists that their new song might be 15-minutes long, and described it as something that would "build towards a climax" with John Bonham's drums not coming in for some time. In October 1970, after about 18 months of near constant touring, the song took shape. Page and Plant explained that they started working on it at a 250-year-old Welsh cottage called Bron-yr-Aur, where they wrote the songs for Led Zeppelin III. Page sometimes told a story of the pair sitting by a fire at the cabin as they composed it, a tale that gives the song a mystical origin story, as there could have been spirits at play within those walls.

Page told a different story under oath: When he was called to the stand in 2016 as part of a plagiarism trial over this song, he said that he wrote the music on his own and first played it for his bandmates at Headley Grange in Liphook Road, Headley, Hampshire, where they recorded it using a mobile studio owned by The Rolling Stones. Plant corroborated the story in his testimony.

Fleetwood Mac - "The Chain"



Concert unknown. 1979. Stevie Nicks wrote the song lyrics about Lindsey Buckingham as their relationship was falling apart. Buckingham and Nicks share lead vocals on the song. This song came to represent the resilience of Fleetwood Mac and the strength of their bond as they continued on for many years despite their personal and professional difficulties. It was often the first song they played in concert.
 

Mick Fleetwood: "'The Chain' basically came out of a jam. That song was put together as distinct from someone literally sitting down and writing a song. It was very much collectively a band composition. The riff is John McVie's contribution - a major contribution. Because that bassline is still being played on British TV in the car-racing series to this day. The Grand Prix thing. But it was really something that just came out of us playing in the studio. Originally we had no words to it. And it really only became a song when Stevie wrote some. She walked in one day and said, 'I've written some words that might be good for that thing you were doing in the studio the other day.' So it was put together. Lindsey arranged and made a song out of all the bits and pieces that we were putting down onto tape. And then once it was arranged and we knew what we were doing, we went in and recorded it. But it ultimately becomes a band thing anyway, because we all have so much of our own individual style, our own stamp that makes the sound of Fleetwood Mac. So it's not like you feel disconnected from the fact that maybe you haven't written one of the songs. Because what you do, and what you feel when we're all making music together, is what Fleetwood Mac ends up being, and that's the stuff you hear on the albums. Whether one likes it or not, this is, after all, a combined effort from different people playing music together." (Courtesy: lucky98fm.com.)

The Doobie Brothers - "Listen to the Music"



    Live on 'The Midnight Special', 1973. It was a far different time in music and television. There were only four TV networks, and they all signed off at 1:00 a.m. Producer Burt Sugarman pitched NBC on a Friday night musical variety show that would follow the high-rated The Tonight Show at 1 a.m. and retain some of its audience. The network didn’t bite. So he bought the airtime, found a sponsor (Chevrolet) and on August 19, 1972, premiered the 90-minute program, on which the acts played live, as a special. The Midnight Special drew enough viewers for NBC to pick it up. The series ran 450 episodes from February 2, 1973, until May 1, 1981. During its run some of the classic rock acts that appeared included AC/DC, Aerosmith, the Beach Boys, Blondie, David Bowie, Cheap Trick, Jim Croce, the Doobie Brothers, Electric Light Orchestra, Fleetwood Mac, Peter Frampton, Genesis, Billy Joel and Elton John. 
     As for the song itselft...This was the Doobie Brothers' first hit, it was written by the band's lead vocalist Tom Johnston, who also played guitar on the track. He told us about this song: "It was all based around this somewhat Utopian view of the world. The idea was that music would lift man up to a higher plane, and that world leaders, if they were able to sit down on some big grassy knoll where the sun was shining and hear music - such as the type I was playing - would figure out that everybody had more in common than they had not in common, and it was certainly not worth getting in such a bad state of affairs about. Everybody in the world would therefore benefit from this point of view. Just basically that music would make everything better. And of course I've since kind of realized it doesn't work that way."
    

Ray Charles - "Georgia on My Mind"



This was written by Hoagy Carmichael and Stuart Gorrell in 1930. This was a #10 hit for a jazz saxophone player named Frankie Trumbauer in 1931. Many artists have recorded it over the years, including Louis Armstrong, James Brown (a Georgia native), Django Reinhardt, and Willie Nelson. Charles' version is by far the most famous. Charles decided to record this song after his driver suggested it, since Ray kept singing it while riding in the car. This was recorded quickly in New York City - it took only four takes to complete (compared to Charles' usual 10-12 takes). This won Grammy awards for Best Male Vocal Recording and Best Pop Song Performance. The album also won for Best Male Vocal Performance Album, and another song on the album, "Let the Good Times Roll," won for Best R&B Performance, giving Charles a total of four Grammys in 1960.

Bill Withers - "Ain't No Sunshine"




Concert Unknown. In a Songfacts interview with Bill Withers, he explained how this song came about: "I was watching a movie called Days Of Wine And Roses (1962) with Lee Remick and Jack Lemmon. This was Withers' first hit. After spending nine years in the US Navy, he had a job at a factory making parts for airplanes when he was introduced to Booker T. Jones from Booker T. & the MG's. Booker was an elite session musician with Stax Records, where Otis Redding, Wilson Pickett and many other soul legends recorded. He brought in some other top-notch musicians, including Stephen Stills on lead guitar, and produced this album for Withers, who was 32 when it was recorded. The part where Withers repeats "I know, I know," has become a very recognizable piece of the song, but it wasn't what he had in mind. Withers told Songfacts: "I wasn't going to do that, then Booker T. said, 'No, leave it like that.' I was going to write something there, but there was a general consensus in the studio. It was an interesting thing because I've got all these guys that were already established, and I was working in the factory at the time. Graham Nash was sitting right in front of me, just offering his support. Stephen Stills was playing and there was Booker T. and Al Jackson and Donald Dunn - all of the MGs except Steve Cropper. They were all these people with all this experience and all these reputations, and I was this factory worker just sort of puttering around. So when their general feeling was, 'Leave it like that,' I left it like that."

Steve Wonder - "Live at Musikladen"



A 1974 concert on German TV show Musikladen/Beat Club Featuring... Ollie Brown - drums Mike Sembello - guitar Marlo Henderson - guitar Reggie McBride -bass Denise Williams - vocals Lani Groves - vocals Shirley Brewer - vocals Song list: 1. Jam 2. Contusion 3. Higher Ground 4. Don't You Worry 'Bout A Thing 5. I Can See The Sun In Late December 6. He's Misstra Know-It-All 7. Living For The City 8. Superstition. Wonder has sold over 100 million records worldwide, which placed him among the best-selling music artists of all time.[7] He has won 25 Grammy Awards, making him one of the most awarded artists of all time.

Steve Winwood & Eric Clapton - "Can't find my way home"



Crossroads Guitar Festival, Illinois. 2007.  The two originally recorded the Winwood-penned “Can’t Find My Way Home,” in 1969 as bandmates in the supergroup Blind Faith, which rose out of their previous bands, Traffic and Cream, respectively. Winwood wrote this and sang lead. Many critics noted that Blind Faith sounded a lot more like Winwood's old band Traffic than Clapton's Cream, which is what Clapton was going for.

Joe Bonamassa - "Best Solos"



A collections of Joe's best live solos both on stage and in the studio. Joe Bonamassa is an American blues rock guitarist, singer and songwriter. When he was 12 years old, Bonamassa opened for B.B. King. In the last 13 years Bonamassa has put out 15 solo albums through his independent record label J&R Adventures, of which 11 have reached number 1 on the Billboard Blues charts. onamassa has played alongside such artists as Stephen StillsEric ClaptonBlondie ChaplinForeignerBuddy GuySteve WinwoodWarren HaynesSolomon Hicks,and Derek Trucks among others.[4] His career highlights include performances at the Royal Albert Hall and a Grammy Award nomination in 2013. In addition to his music career, Joe Bonamassa runs a nonprofit organization called the Keeping the Blues Alive Foundation, whose mission is to further music education by funding scholarships and providing music education resources to schools in need.

Guns N' Roses - "Sweet Child O' Mine"



Live in Paris - 1992. A live concert recorded in June, 6th 1992 in Paris, France with special guests Steven Tyler and Joe Perry from Aerosmith.The song hit #1 in America on September 10, 1988, and stayed there for two weeks. While it was climbing to the top spot, Guns N' Roses was touring as the opening act for Aerosmith. By the end of the tour on September 15, G N' R had eclipsed their headliners in popularity and were chosen for the cover of Rolling Stone for their November 17 issue. The lyrics came from a poem Axl Rose was working on. He wrote the song about his girlfriend, Erin Everly, the daughter of Don Everly of the Everly Brothers. After dating for four years, they got married at a quickie wedding in Las Vegas on April 28, 1990, but just nine months later the marriage was annulled.

The Band - "The Weight"



Concert unknown. "The Weight" is probably The Band's greatest song, and is certainly the most memorable track off its greatest album, Music from Big Pink. Some of rock's biggest names have covered the song. Surprisingly, the most well-known of The Band's songs made its way onto this breakout album almost by accident. They recorded "The Weight" with virtually no rehearsal and weren't originally sure if they would even use it. But when the album was released to far greater critical than popular success, the under-rehearsed afterthought was the album's closest thing to a hit.

The Marshall Tucker Band - "Can't You See"



September 10th, 1973. Grand Opera House - Macon, GA. This became the anthem song for The Marshall Tucker Band, similar to "Free Bird" for Lynyrd Skynyrd. It was never a Top 40 hit, but was very popular on Album Oriented Radio (AOR) and continues to get a lot of airplay on Classic Rock stations. The song was named the #1 greatest Southern Rock song ever recorded by Ultimate Classic Rock with Sweet Home Alabama as runner-up. The open in unusual - it starts with the picking of a guitar and the playing of a flute. Jerry Eubanks of the Marshall Tucker Band played the flute, giving the song a very distinctive sound - it's not a common instrument in the world of Southern Rock.

Buffalo Springfield - "For what it's worth"



Live At Monterey - 1967. The Monterey International Pop Music Festival was a three-day concert event held June 16 to June 18, 1967, at the Monterey County Fairgrounds in Monterey, California. In the book Neil Young: Long May You Run: The Illustrated History, Stephen Stills tells the story of this song's origin: "I had had something kicking around in my head. I wanted to write something about the kids that were on the line over in Southeast Asia that didn't have anything to do with the device of this mission, which was unraveling before our eyes. 

Phil Collins - "In the air tonight"



Birmingham, England July 1986. Clapton booked a special gig at the Birmingham NEC, featuring the entire August band, that he filmed for professional release. The show centered around hits from his long career such as “Layla,” “White Room” and “Sunshine of Your Love,” but near the end, he brought out Phil Collins to play “In the Air Tonight.” The song launched Collins’ solo career five years earlier, and it also launched more urban legends than just about any other song in music history. The stories vary, but most center around Collins supposedly witnessing a man refuse to save another man from drowning. Collins then gives the guy a front row ticket to his concert and sings it right to his face, letting him know he saw everything. The tale, of course, is wildly untrue. The lyrics were really just a stream-of-conscious rant that poured out of Collins as he was dealing with an extremely painful divorce. “I’m not quite sure what the song is about, but there’s a lot of anger, a lot of despair and a lot of frustration,” he told Rolling Stone last year. “Nobody knows what the song is about, and I kind of like the mystery. And now NFL players use it to work out. I saw a video recently of Steph Curry singing it in his car, and it was just in an ad for milk chocolate. Where will it end? But I’m not complaining. It paid for this house we’re in right now!”

Billy Joel - "Piano Man"



 

Live at Wembley - 1984. The live concert was broadcast live to 19 countries and showcased the performer at his peak. The An Innocent Man Tour was a 1984 concert tour by singer-songwriter Billy Joel. The tour began on January 18 in Providence, Rhode Island (which went on despite a snow storm[1]) and ended on July 5 with the last of seven shows at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The tour was Joel's first large world tour since a 1982 motorcycle accident.[2] The tour was very popular, with a contemporaneous report stating that finding tickets except through scalpers was "virtually impossible."


 

Jimi Hendrix - "Voodoo Child"



In January of 1969, the late, great Jimi Hendrix performed at the Konserthuset in Stockholm, Sweden. For a long time, this amazing show was considered to be lost, but was luckily located in 2004 at the Swedish television station SVT just before heading for erasure. Since that time, the footage has been remastered with remarkably clear results. The potential loss of this footage is all the more heartbreaking considering that it was among his last performances before his tragic death in 1970. The set list for the evening included “Killing Floor”“Spanish Castle Magic”“Fire”“Hey Joe”“Voodoo Child (Slight Return)”“Red House” and “Sunshine of Your Love”."Voodoo Chile" is a 15-minute improvised structured jam recorded at the Record Plant in New York City by Hendrix, Experience drummer Mitch Mitchell, organist Steve Winwood, and bassist Jack Casady. It was distilled the following day by the Experience into the shorter, more intense "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)."

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